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Shakespeare Indexes Edit

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Welcome to the Shakespeare Indexing Project Edit

IntroductionEdit

We are proud to offer you the following indexes for your enjoyment and elucidation. Just think of these carefully chosen quotations as "incerpts." Like excerpts, we believe them to be the embodiments of the pithiest and most poignant thoughts and sentiments of the great playwrite.In addition, they will take you into the heart of the text, the thick of things. Shakespeare's greatest moments will never be left lying alongside a path, like caught fish left to gasp their last after being removed from the water that gave them life and sustenance. We believe that incerpts will be a major factor in the growth and development of digital scholarship in the years to come, particularly incerpts made using the EC line-indexer.

How to Use the Index BuilderEdit

Just go to the Phillins Free Educational Resources pageto download a searchable electronic edition of Shakespeare's Complete Works.

Type in your keywords to the search engine, and "let her rip!" It's as easy as falling off a log, and you don't have to get wet!

Word Bank Edit


Add to the list of keywords that we might use as headings for future indexes.

Valiant, honour, ambition, destiny




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On Virtue and Vice, Passion, Pride and cetera Edit

Concerning Love and Hate
Concerning Deity, Fate, Fame and Fortune
Concerning Bastardy and Legitimacy
Concerning Revenge and Forgiveness
Concerning Guilt and Innocence
Concerning Power Ambition and Weakness, Slavery and Freedom
Concerning Crime and Punishment
Concerning Chastity, Infidelity and Marriage
Concerning Foolishness, Ignorance and Wit
Concerning Wealth, Money and its Opposite
Concerning Beauty and Ugliness
Concerning Good Friends and Bad, Friendship and Enmity
Concerning War and Peace, Honour and Disgrace, Courage and Cowardice
Concerning Good and Evil, Villany and Virtue
Concerning Saints, Sinners and Whores
Concerning Death, Salvation and the Hereafter
Concerning Murder and Suicide
Concerning Madness
Concerning Wives and Daughters
Concerning Justice
Concerning Mirth and Melancholy
Concerning Leadership
Concerning Beasts, Noble or Not
Concerning Vice, Vanity, Virtue, Treachery and Trust
Concerning Time, Work and Leisure
Concerning Faith
Pearls of Wisdom
Witticisms
Concerning Miscellaneous

Titles of Works Edit

A Midsummer Night's Dream
A Winter's Tale
All's Well That Ends Well
Antony and Cleopatra
As You Like It
Cymbeline
King Lear
Loves Labours Lost
Much Ado About Nothing
Othello, the Moore of Venice
Pericles, Prince of Tyre
Romeo and Juliet
The Comedy of Errors
The Life of King Henry the Fifth
The First part of King Henry the Sixth
The Second part of King Henry the Sixth
The Third part of King Henry the Sixth
The Life and Death of King John
The Life and Death of Richard the Second
The Life and Death of Richard the Third
The Life of King Henry the Eighth
The Life and Death of Julies Caesar
The First part of King Henry the Fourth
The Second part of King Henry the Fourth
The Merchant of Venice
The Merry Wives of Windsor
The Taming of the Shrew
The Tempest
The Tragedy of Coriolanus
The Tragedy of Hamlet
The Tragedy of Macbeth #| The Tragedy of Macbeth
Timon of Athens
Titus Andronicus
Troilus and Cressida
Twelfth Night
Two Gentlemen of Verona

The Plays Edit

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A Midsummer Night's Dream Edit

The course of true love....
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she...
Lord, what fools these mortals be.
The eye of man hath not heard...
Besides, virginity is proud, peevish, idle...





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The Tragedy of Macbeth Edit

Make thick my blood....
Will all great Neptune's ocean...
Out damned spot...
It (life) is a tale told by an idiot...
Why should I play the Roman fool...
Lay on, MacDuff, and damned be him...
Swords I smile at...





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A Winter's TaleEdit



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All's Well That Ends Well Edit



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Antony and CleopatraEdit



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As You Like ItEdit



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Cymbeline Edit



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King LearEdit



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Loves Labours LostEdit



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Much Ado About Nothing Edit



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Othello, the Moore of VeniceEdit



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Pericles, Prince of Tyre Edit



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Romeo and Juliet Edit



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The Comedy of ErrorsEdit



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The Life of King Henry the Fifth Edit



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All Parts of Henry the VIEdit

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The Life and Death of King JohnEdit



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The Life and Death of Richard the SecondEdit



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The Life and Death of Richard the ThirdEdit



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The Life of King Henry the EighthEdit



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The Life and Death of Julies Caesar Edit



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The First and Second parts of King Henry the Fourth Edit



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The Merchant of VeniceEdit



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The Merry Wives of WindsorEdit



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The Taming of the ShrewEdit



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The Tempest Edit



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The Tragedy of CoriolanusEdit



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The Tragedy of Hamlet Edit



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Timon of AthensEdit



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Titus AndronicusEdit



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Troilus and CressidaEdit



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Twelfth NightEdit



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Two Gentlemen of Verona Edit

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Concerning Love and Hate Edit


Mine only love sprung from my only hate...
Love is like a child...
The power of love to transform
Away with Love!
Love has foresworn me...
Love with no stomach (for it)...
The effect of ingratitude
Romeo's confession of his hateful origins.
Heaven kills joys with love as cruel punishment
And why not death rather than living torment?
Alas, how love can trifle with itself!
Thou wouldst as soon go kindle fire with snow as seek to quench the fire of love with words.
But love is blind and lovers cannot see...
O, how this spring of love resembleth the uncertain glory of an April day. ></A>


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Concerning Bastardy and Legitimacy Edit

Bringing up bastards
A bastard kinder to his father than legitimate children
Concerning love of all things bastard




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Concerning Revenge and Forgiveness Edit

What blood is this?... - Romeo and Juliet




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Concerning Guilt and Innocence Edit





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Concerning Power and Weakness, Slavery and Freedom Edit

Live as slaves to the nobility
Bathe our hands in Caesar's blood

Penury and shame the result of lifelong service.

Ambition should be made of sterner stuff

As he was valiant, I honour him: but, as he was ambitious, I slew him.

...having nothing, nothing can he lose.

How long a time lies in one little word! (banishment)

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Concerning Crime and Punishment Edit

How long a time lies in one little word! (banishment)

How oft the sight of means to do ill deeds make deeds ill done!




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Concerning Chastity, Infidelity and Marriage
Edit

Concerning premarital sex




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Concerning Wealth, Money and its Opposite Edit





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Concerning Foolishness, Ignorance and Wit
Edit

I am a fool, and full of poverty.

A jest's prosperity lies in the ear of him that hears it, never in the tongue

'Better a witty fool, than a foolish wit.'

...brevity is the soul of wit,...

Cudgel thy brains no more about it,...

...it was Greek to me.

Look, he's winding up the watch of his wit; by and by it will strike.

How now, wit! whither wander you?




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==Concerning Beauty and Ugliness ==




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Concerning Good Friends and Bad, Friendship and Enmity Edit

Let friends be free and untied
The world denying friendship
To bewail friends lost...
To be far from one's friends
Friends for political reasons
Alexander the Great
Bad friends
Limited, very limited friendship

Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio:
...where there is true friendship, there needs none. (ceremony)




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Concerning War and Peace, Honour and Disgrace, Courage and Cowardice Edit

Give me war...
To know our enemies...
A peace is of the nature of a conquest;
But why should honour outlive honesty?
Where is your ancient courage?
Boldness be my friend...
...Give me the spirit,...
Cowards die many times before their deaths...

Here is my journey's end, here is my butt, and very sea-mark of my utmost sail.




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Concerning Good and Evil, Villany and Virtue Edit

The price of villany
A plain villain
Damn the villains!
'Hell is empty

And all the devils are here.'

How far that little candle throws his beams! So shines a good deed in a naughty world.




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Concerning Death and the Hereafter Edit

Great men die...
I shall be saved by my husband...
...will they (the spirits) come when you do call for them?





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Concerning Saints, Sinners and Whores Edit

A fear that one's kingly father is not really so.
And prostitute me...




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Concerning Miscellaneous Edit


Alexander the Great
The making of Christians will raise the price of pork
...Where every something, being blent together, turns to a wild of nothing, save of joy,...

...he makes a swan-like end, Fading in music:

He that is giddy thinks the world turns round.




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Concerning Murder and Suicide Edit

Othello's death by suicide
Pyramus' and Thisbe's suicide
Romeo's Suicide Soliquy
The murder (execution) of a child
The asassination of Caesar
Confusion now hath made his masterpiece!

Give me my robe, put on my crown; I have immortal longings in me:




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Concerning Madness
Edit

When we are born, we cry that we are come, to this great stage of fools: this a good block;




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Concerning Wives and Daughters Edit

Tigers, not daughters...
With cunning thou hast filched my daughter's heart...
Beshrew your heart...
Shylock, Concerning Christian husbands
Concerning marriage between different social states




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Concerning Justice Edit

A pound of flesh
The quality of mercy is not strain'd,




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Concerning Mirth and Melancholy Edit

As melancholy as...




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Concerning Leadership Edit



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Concerning Beasts, Noble or Not Edit

The Mouse and the Lion...
The fable of the fox, the ape, and the humble-bee
If thy wits run the wild goose chase...
Thy wolf in sheep's array...

A horse! a horse! my kingdom for a horse!




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Concerning Deity, Fate, Fame and Fortune Edit

As flies to wanton boys, are we to the gods...
...but be not afraid of greatness: some are born great,...

He lives in fame that died in virtue's cause.




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Concerning Vice, Virtue, Vanity, Treachery and Trust Edit

...like an envious sneaping frost, that bites the first-born infants of the spring.
Dost thou think, because thou art virtuous, there shall be no more cakes and ale?
Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar.
False face must hide what the false heart doth know.
...how the fishes live in the sea...

He lives in fame that died in virtue's cause.

...he that loves to be flattered is worthy o' the flatterer

How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees?

How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is to have a thankless child!




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Concerning Time, Work and Leisure Edit

...better three hours too soon than a minute too late.





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Concerning Faith Edit

...he wears his faith but as the fashion of his hat;



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Witticisms Edit

...he does it with a better grace, but I do it more natural.

Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot that it do singe yourself:



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Pearls of Wisdom Edit

Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot that it do singe yourself:

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